A New Day

In the Many Mellys post, I stepped quite squarely into a hornets nest. I would like to apologize if I have upset or harmed anyone by my use of the words gender queer. While I think there are many similarities and points of connection between being a flat chested woman (as a result of breast cancer) and to be confronted with expectations about my body from anyone other than myself and the ‘spectrum’ of what it may mean to be gender queer, I understand that transgendered people may feel angry and resentful at the manner in which I used the words and for that, I apologize. I mean no disrespect.

If you get to know me in a personal way, you will know that I sometimes PUT my foot in it, I can be quite a bull in a china shop. I do not have a problem sussing through my mistakes, or apologizing if need be. I will continue to talk on the topic of opting out of reconstruction, what that can mean as a woman in our society and my feelings about being flat chested when appropriate. I am not an intellectual and my discussions will, for the most part, be from a personal stand point. I appreciate discussion and remain open to your thoughts.

And this is where I will leave the conversation for now.

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My work with Carol Soderlund is progressing.  We are narrowing the controls of our study. I want the color I want to print and Carol is helping me sift through the media and materials so that I can print the color and value I intend. The work we are doing together is amazing. I am seriously considering taking her ProChem workshop on the topic. I don’t know that I will NEED to take the class after I finish my work with Carol, but I do love the work she does and would like to have the experience.

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 We are working through the ideas and methods of batching, seeing if steaming is a good approach to setting the dye while using my current obsession of multicolor printing. I did get a bit excited last week and made some printing errors, this week, I don’t want to make any mistakes, although mistakes sure do help with the learning process.

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I love the pace of the work I am engaged in. I cut one yard of cloth into 16 pieces, which ends up being about 8×10″ each. This size is very easy to complete and I am blowing through cloth. When we are done establishing a methodology to get the results I want to see, I am going to have a boatload of cloth to use. And I have been wanting to make easy-peasy, jelly roll sized quilts, because who doesn’t want a stack of quilted pretties to snuggle up with? Having several Jelly Roll sized quilts, being able to switch them out and create a new, quick look in the living room? Priceless.

I guess I need to measure the Jelly Roll quilt I made last year. This quilt won’t be strips, so I guess I am just using the size as a reference and not the name or style of the quilt.

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Comments

  1. We all stick our feet in our mouth at one point or other. It’s just good to know when it’s in there so you can pull it out. Some people continue to talk around the foot in their mouth! 😉 You are a good person and I am sure anyone who knows you knows that you did not mean anything malicious or discrediting to their feelings. You are good to apologize. 😀

    The pieces of printed fabric you are making are fabulous Melly! You really should find a company to make them into a fabric line. I’m sure there are many people who would love to buy your line of fabrics. Although perhaps you want them only for you and no one else, which would be wonderful as well. Lap quilts are about 52″ to 68″ wide by about 68″ to 78″ long. You might want to try a Turning 20 pattern for your pieces. You have 20 fat quarters for the quilt and It has large blocks that show off the patterns well. The quilts are usually bigger than a lap quilt though so you might want to use it with fewer blocks to get the size you want. I made one for my sister from batiks – photo is here: http://somethingcleveraboutnothing.blogspot.com/search?q=turning+twenty – I wish I hadn’t used the dark purple but oh well – it’s made and done and it was an easy pattern. Can’t wait to see what you do!

  2. I love what I can see of your fabrics so far! What beautiful quilts they will make.
    I do not have the patience to dye enough fabric for a quilt. Also, I think I’m too lazy. I’ve done some dyeing but tend to pull out the paints more often. I really admire your tenacity and spirit!

  3. Susan Dunne-Lederhaas says:

    Awesome, Melly.. I spent many years playing with dyes, mixing my own colors from the basic palette.. fun, but that was a long time ago.. Enjoy what you are doing with the small pieces.. great way to learn..
    Susan

  4. janice n says:

    Love what you are doing. Carol’s classes are fantastic. Lots of work but you
    learn s ton

  5. Jeannie says:

    I too, love what you are creating. I love the organic quality of the prints. The carving lines in the background give the cloth an ancient feel, which I am drawn to. The colors are gorgeous. I can imagine that you are thinking of fun names to go with each color. 🙂 This is so exciting to read about your stretching and learning in all aspects of your life. I do wish Carol would write a book. Taking intense classes aren’t in the cards, but working through exercises in a book is my idea of a heavenly way to spend my time and learn. As to the “foot in mouth” disease, I am also guilty of it. I know what you were trying to say. xoxo